Chocolate Orange Tart

final tart resizeSomeone (my mom) always gives me a Terry’s Chocolate Orange for Christmas and, sometimes (for sometimes, read usually) I will find a time when no one is at home, to eat it all in one sitting in front of a made-for-TV romance.  When the signature bake for chocolate week on the Bake Off was a chocolate tart, and when I found a recipe for a chocolate orange one in the Great British Bake Off Big Book of Baking there was no question about what I was going to make this week.

The tart in the Big Book of Baking is made with normal shortcrust pastry so, since the Bake Off required chocolate, I searched the books for a recipe for a chocolate pastry. The only one I could find, also in the Big Book of Baking, was the pastry used in small malted chocolate tarts.  The recipe promised a “rich shortbread-like dough”.  Sounded fine to me.

I wasn’t too sure of the quantities again.  This is what happens when you mix and match your recipes, but the pastry for the “proper” chocolate orange tart used 150g of flour and sugar in total, and the chocolate pastry recipe used 230g of dry ingredients.  My thinking was that, with these quantities, I would definitely have enough chocolate dough to cover a 23cm tart tin.

I made the pastry first.  The recipe says that it’s best made in a processor to avoid handling it.  I don’t have one, but out came the trusty pastry blender again.004I mixed flour, icing sugar and cocoa powder, added cold cubed butter, and used the blender to get to breadcrumb stage.  I added an egg yolk to bring it to a dough.  I had to add some extra water (about a tablespoon) to get the ball of heavy, slightly sticky dough required by the recipe.  I wrapped it in cling film and put it into the fridge.

I’d  been promised some help with the rolling out, which was to be done between two sheets of cling film to prevent white flour marks on the pastry.  Matthew did have a very light touch with the rolling-pin, that’s for sure.  Luckily, he was distracted by a cardboard tube, sorry, did I say cardboard tube? I meant pirate telescope, and went to sail the seven seas on the HMS Jolly Roger with his sister.  Neither of them were seen again until they got a whiff of chocolate.

I rolled out the pastry and lost my nerve about the 23cm tin.  I didn’t think I’d have enough, so I decided to use a 20cm tin instead.  I peeled the top layer of cling film away, flipped the pastry over onto the top of the tin, and peeled the second layer off.  The pastry was really soft and sticky and pretty thick.

raw chocolate tart resize

Perhaps I should have kept rolling and gone for the 23cm tin.  It also had some white patches.  I don’t think they’d go down very well on the Bake Off.

It was only when the pastry was chilling in the tin, that I re-read the malted chocolate tart recipe, and found that I should have put the pastry back into the fridge once it was rolled and before it into the tin.  Oh well.

I baked the pastry blind at 160° fan for the 12 minutes required by the recipe.  It was still very soft at this point.  I gave it another 3 minutes before I took the baking beads out and then another 10 altogether (I checked  after 5 minutes, gave it 3 more, checked again, and then another 2).  I wasn’t very confident when they pastry eventually came out of the oven.  It looked really thick and spongy.  Should’ve gone for the larger tin.

There were two parts to the filling; chocolate and orange.  They were both pretty easy to make.  For the chocolate, I melted dark chocolate and butter over a pan of simmering water (the recipe stipulates dark chocolate of no more than 60% cocoa solids – the lowest cocoa content I could find in Tesco without straying into “chocolate-style cake covering” territory was 72% from Dr Oetker  – is it really possible for chocolate to be too chocolaty?)

When the chocolate and butter had melted, I took it off the heat, added plain flour and golden caster sugar and beat in some eggs.

I made the orange filling in the same way with white chocolate and orange zest, which I added alongside the flour and sugar, oh and just egg yolks rather than whole eggs.  I was making ¾ of the filling recipe because of my smaller tin and, when I added the dry ingredients to the orange filling, I ended up with a solid lump.  I put an extra egg yolk in to make it pourable.

I put the tart case onto a baking tray and poured in the chocolate filling.  Then I drizzled the orange filling over the top and drew a skewer through to get a marbled look.

filled tart resize

The tart went into the oven at 180° fan. I checked it after ten minutes.  Too wobbly.  I gave it another two and took it out.  It was set around the edges with a bit of a wobble in the middle.slice of tart

The filling of the tart was great.  Just like eating slightly runny Chocolate Orange.  I wasn’t too keen on the pastry though.  It was a bit thick and cake-like.  Next time (and there has to be a next time, Terry’s Chocolate Orange in a tart – how could anyone resist?), I think I’ll stick to the recipe and use a sweet shortcrust pastry.  I’ll also pluck up the courage to go for the 23cm tin and really thin pastry.  Thinner pastry = more filling. Perfect.

 

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2 thoughts on “Chocolate Orange Tart

  1. The Hungry Mum

    mmmm, choc orange! My v fav flavour. It was my bday a couple of days ago and Miss7 gave me a Terrys Chocolate Orange 😉 I am waiting for school hols to be over so I can eat it in peace.

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    Reply
    1. Hannah Post author

      A very happy birthday to you. Enjoy the chocolate – try not to eat it all at once. I do try, but once I start on a choc orange I can’t stop.

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      Reply

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